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Learning Style Activities for Best Learning

Learning Style Activities for Best Learning
Each child has a specific mode or combination of modes in which she/he learns best.

(1) Visual learners: learn best by seeing flash cards, visual images, matching games, pictures and diagrams, puzzles, watching someone do something, printed material, charts, pictures, posters, wall strips, desk tapes, video tapes, computer programs

(2) Auditory learners: learn best by hearing audio, lectures, educational songs and rhymes, rhythm instruments, recitation, singing and reading aloud

(3) Kinesthetic learners: learn best by doing and touching, long nature walks, model kits, yard work, gardening, textured puzzles and manipulatives, typing instead of writing, drama, dance, lab experiments, building models

(4) Social learners: learn best by interacting with others, one-on-one conversations, discussions, group participation

In addition to the above learning styles, there are many theories about how thinking styles affect a child's learning style. You can find much written about teaching to right brain vs. left brain patterns and multiple intelligences thinking patterns.

Kind of Learner Test
How do you determine which type of learner a student is?
Is she/he a visual learner?
Is she/he an audio learner?
Is she/he a kinesthetic learner?

To give the test you need:

1. A group of not more than 15 students as it is difficult to observe more than that number of students at one time.

2. A list of the student's names which you can mark as you observe their reaction.

Mark "V" - Visual learner

Mark "A" - Audio learner.

Mark "K" - Kinesthetic learner

Reactions to watch for:

VISUAL LEARNERS will usually close their eyes or look at the ceiling.

AUDIO LEARNERS will use their lips or whisper as they try to memorize.

KINESTHETIC LEARNERS will use their fingers to count off items or write in the air.

The student with a PHOTOGRAPHIC MIND will repeat things exactly in the order they are given and will be disturbed if someone changes the order.

THE TEST:

Start by telling your students that you are going to give them a test to determine what kind of learners they are: VISUAL, AUDIO, or KINESTHETIC.

This test consists of pretending that the students are going to the store to get some items for you. First, you will WRITE the list on the board, allowing the student to watch you, but not copy it. Next, you will give them the list ORALLY. You will not write it and neither must they. Then, you will dictate the list ORALLY to them and they will WRITE it down.

After each presentation, you will ask your students to repeat the list to you if they wish. If a student is not able to repeat the list, tell him not to worry. The response to your request should be voluntary and the list does not have to be given back in order.

Note: Use the most predominate characteristic as a symptom.

The specific test or tests where student has the highest recall is a reinforcement of his native way of learning. However, the symptoms are to be used only as the prime indication.

FIRST PRESENTATION:

List: TOOTHPASTE SOAP KLEENEX COMB STATIONERY (for younger students) PENCIL ICE CREAM STAMPS TOY PAPER

1. Write the list on the board while the students are watching. DO NOT let them WRITE.

2. Allow students to view the list for approximately one minute while researcher observes their reactions and marks the symptoms after students' name.

Symptoms:

VISUAL LEARNERS close their eyes or look at the ceiling (V after name);

AUDIO LEARNERS move their lips or whisper (A after name);

KINESTHETIC LEARNERS count the items on their fingers or write in the air (K after name)

3. ERASE the list.

4. Ask, "Who would like to repeat the items to me?"

5. Observe that the VISUAL LEARNERS will waive their hands enthusiastically.

6. Call on them to recite ORALLY, one at a time, (note that after a few students have recited, a few more timid hands will go up. These are usually AUDIO LEARNERS who have learned the list, not from SEEING it, but from HEARING the other students say the items.

7. As you notice a student's symptoms, record a "V", "A", or "K" after his name.

SECOND PRESENTATION:

List: FOLDER PAPER TALCUM POWDER NAIL FILE COUGH DROPS SHAVING CREAM (OR) RUBBER BANDS NAIL FILE POP CORN ERASER BAND AIDS

1. Dictate the list ORALLY (no writing by either researcher or students). Repeat dictation a second time, pausing for a moment after each item.

2. Observe that the VISUAL learners will close their eyes or try to see the items. The audio learners will whisper each item as you dictate it. The KINESTHETIC learners will use their hands to mark off the number of items or will WRITE the words in the air.

3. Ask, "Who would like to repeat the list?"

4. The AUDIO learners will be the most eager to repeat the items you have dictated.

5. Make the appropriate notations of "V", "A", or "K" after the students' names as you notice their reactions.

THIRD PRESENTATION:

List: LIPSTICK BAND AIDS RAZOR BLADES COUGH SYRUP FOUNTAIN PEN (OR) PEN SOAP CANDY COMB STRING

1. Tell the students to have a pencil and paper ready to WRITE the list as you dictate it ORALLY. In fact, spell any words as you dictate if you see the spelling creates a problem.

2. After you have finished dictating the list, tell the students to rewrite the list, and to look at the one they have written from your dictation.

3. When they have finished rewriting the list, tell them to turn the paper over and WRITE the list from memory.

4. After they have finished, check to see which students have been able to repeat the list wholly or in part.

5. Notice that students who were successful in either the first or second presentation of the test are frequently the first ones finished.
---------------The test may be repeated, using numbers. Most students have a different form of recall for numbers than they have for words. -----------------

 

EVALUATION OF THE TEST:

1. A teacher/parent will have a better understanding of the individual differences of the students.

2. The teacher can encourage the students to find their natural way of learning. "Join it; don't fight it".

3. While all three types of learning should be developed, a student should use his natural way to learn when he is under pressure of studying for tests, etc.

THE VISUAL LEARNER should realize that while he learns fast, he can forget equally fast. To strengthen his recall, it is good to develop the practice of writing and outlining the subject.

THE AUDIO LEARNER will be more benefited by the use of a tape recorder. The more he hears a subject, the more recall is possible.

THE KINESTHETIC LEARNER must write to recall material learned. Outlining material is a very effective method of strengthening recall.

A PHOTOGRAPHIC MIND is like a Polaroid camera. The picture develops fast and can fade equally fast, unless the emulsion is placed on the picture. In the learning process, the emulsion is to WRITE as well as to LOOK. THE PHOTOGRAPHIC MIND will often have a real problem in abstract thinking, especially in mathematics. SEEING the picture in association with the abstraction often assists a student of this type.

Usually a person has more than one way to learn. She/he may be, perhaps, highly visual, fairly kinesthetic, and no audio; or other combinations.

All three types of learning should be developed as far as possible in each student. An AUDIO LEARNER should try to visualize what he hears. A VISUAL LEARNER should try to be more attentive in lecture programs or language laboratory work. A KINESTHETIC LEARNER should try to listen and to visualize, but all three need to WRITE.

How can a teacher cover all three types of learning?

VISUAL; Ability to HEAR and WRITE what is seen.

AUDIO: Ability to RECOGNIZE VISUALLY and WRITE what is HEARD.

KINESTHETIC: Ability to HEAR AND VISUALIZE what is WRITTEN.

This careful attention to the three types of learning is well illustrated in the MAGNETIC PATTERNS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE; and is one of the basic principles behind the phenomenal results achieved by students using it.